Griffin Poetry Prize Home

By funding the Griffin Poetry Prize
- the world’s largest prize for a first edition single collection of poetry written in, or translated into English, from any country in the world – the Griffin Trust For Excellence In Poetry aims to spark the public’s imagination and raise awareness of the crucial role poetry plays in our cultural life.

Judges for the 2015 Griffin Poetry Prize Announced and New Trustee Welcomed

The trustees of The Griffin Trust For Excellence In Poetry are pleased to announce the 2015 Griffin Poetry Prize judges – Tim Bowling (Canada), Fanny Howe (US) and Piotr Sommer (Poland) – and to welcome Mark Doty (US) as a new Griffin trustee.Learn more here.

Adélia Prado receives Griffin Lifetime Recognition Award

On June 4, 2014, revered Brazilian writer and poet Adélia Prado was honoured with The Griffin Trust for Excellence in Poetry’s Lifetime Recognition Award, presented to her by trustee Robert Hass. Learn more about Adélia Prado here.

International Poetry Calendar

Somewhere in the world, every day, someone is writing poetry, reading poetry, encouraging and mentoring poetry, awarding recognition to poetry, presenting and celebrating poetry in new and unusual ways. Take a look at where and when and how poetry is happening. Send us poetry-related dates or events you’d like to see on our ever-blossoming Griffin International Poetry Calendar.

Tweets

2014-winning-books

Brenda Hillman’s Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire and Anne Carson’s Red Doc> Win the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize

TORONTO – June 5, 2014Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire by Brenda Hillman and Red Doc> by Anne Carson are the International and Canadian winners of the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize. They each received C$65,000 in prize money.Get all the details here.

Looking back on
Griffin Poetry Prize 2014

 


Photos by Tom Sandler Photography


  • Poem of the Week
    November 16, 2014 to November 23, 2014

    from Art Notes
    by Derek Mahon
    Derek Mahon's Art Notes - of which "A LIGHTHOUSE IN MAINE" is just one from the collection "Life on Earth", and just one of variations found in earlier Mahon works - take visual arts as the cue for their poetic explorations. When a poem looks to another art form for its content and inspiration in this fashion, is the approach likely to generous expand or problematically constrain what the poet produces?
    Poem & Notes | Archives